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Preparing for an interview? Want to just revisit Java SE 7 features? Trying to recollect or revise a Java SE programming construct? Let me take you back in time to what was introduced first in Java SE 7? Join me for this tutorial series on Java as we all eagerly await the official release of Java SE 9. Java SE 7 Release Date: 28-07-2011 Java SE 7 Code Name: Dolphin Java SE 7 Highlights Strings in switch statements. Automatic resource management in try statements. Improved type inference for generic instance creation, AKA the diamond operator <>. Simplified varargs method declaration. Binary integer literals. Allowing underscores in numeric literals. Catching multiple exception types and rethrowing exceptions with improved type checking. I have provided some of the most important core language enhancements for JDK 7.0, along with code samples. The examples provided bel... (more)

Secrets Of The Masters: Core Java Job Interview Questions

JDJ's Enterprise Editor, Yakov Fain (pictured) writes: If you are planning to hit the job market,  you may need to refresh some of the Java basic terms and techniques to prepare yourself for a technical interview. Let me offer you some of the core Java questions that you might expect during the interviews.  For  most questions  I’ve provided only  short  answers to encourage further research.  I have included only  questions for mid (*) and senior level (**) Java developers. These sample questions could also become handy for people who need to interview Java developers (see also the article "Interviewing Enterprise Java Developers"). Disclaimer. This article has been originally published three or four years ago, hundreds of thousands Java developers have read it, but I still use some of these questions while interviewing Java developers. Guess what? Every other Jav... (more)

X-oops, I did it again

(LinuxWorld) — One of my non-profit Web sites, VarLinux.org, ran on my modified version of the PHP-Nuke weblog package from the site's inception in March 2001 until late November 2002. I chose PHP-Nuke as a starting point because I was very impressed with it. However, the more I learned how to use PHP, the more I realized that PHP-Nuke was not only a tangled mess but that I had made it even worse with my modifications. A year later, I was faced with the fact that VarLinux.org was not only lame because it was based on PHP-Nuke, it was also showing its age. It lacked features of other weblogs, and still lacked many of the features I had intended to add to the site. If I were going to fix the code, the first thing I would do would be to make it an object-oriented system. I toyed with the idea of converting my code into OOP-based code, but I concluded that if the P... (more)

Who Are The All-Time Heroes of i-Technology?

I wonder how many people, as I did, found themselves thrown into confusion by the death last week of Jean Ichbiah (pictured), inventor of Ada.  Learning that the inventor of a computer programming language is already old enough to have lived 66 years (Ichbiah was 66 when he succumbed to brain cancer) is a little like learning that your 11-year-old daughter has grown up and left home or that the first car you ever bought no longer is legal because it runs on gasoline in an age where all automobiles must run on water. How can something as novel, as new, as a computing language possibly already be so old-fangled that an early practitioner like Ichbiah can already no longer be with us? The thought was so disquieting that it took me immediately back to the last time I wrote about Ichbiah, and indeed about Ada Lovelace for whom his language was named. It was in the context ... (more)

The i-Technology Right Stuff

Related Links: Wanted: 19 More of the Top Software People in the World Sung and Unsung i-Technology Heroes Who's Missing from SYS-CON's i-Technology Top Twenty?" Our search for the Twenty Top Software People in the World is nearing completion. In the SYS-CON tradition of empowering readers, we are leaving the final "cut" to you, so here are the top 40 nominations in alphabetical order. Our aim this time round is to whittle this 40 down to our final twenty, not (yet) to arrange those twenty in any order of preference. All you need to do to vote is to go to the Further Details page of any nominee you'd like to see end up in the top half of the poll when we close voting on Christmas Eve, December 24, and cast your vote or votes. To access the Further Details of each nominee just click on their name. Happy voting!   In alphabetical order the nominees are:   Tim Berner... (more)

i-Technology 2008 Predictions: Where's RIAs, AJAX, SOA and Virtualization Headed in 2008?

2007 was undoubtedly the year of Social Networking, but what of 2008? Will '08 be the year of "Unified Communications" or the year when CMS comes to stand for "Community Management System" - or even "Collaboration Management System"? Or will it be the year of a giga-merger, to beat the mere mega-mergers of 2007? As usual at the end of each year, SYS-CON has been informally polling its globe-girdling network of software developers, industry executives, commentators, investors, writers, and editors. As always, the range and depth of their answers is fascinating, throwing light not just on where the industry is going but also how it's going to get there, why, because of who, within what kind of time-scale. Enjoy! RIAs versus AJAX . Ruby on Rails . PHP . Facebook Competitors  TIM BRAY Director of Web Technologies, Sun Tim Bray managed the Oxford English Dictionary projec... (more)

As IBM Jumps On Board, There's Just No Stopping AJAX Now

"We've seen the Web moving from a publishing paradigm to an e-business paradigm to an AJAX paradigm." That is the considered verdict of IBM Software Group's CTO of Emerging Internet Technologies, David Boloker. And he's right: AJAX is here, it's growing, and it's (potentially) the biggest thing to hit the i-Technology world since Java. For those who dislike talk of "paradigm shifts" and suchlike, on principle, let's examine why this particular shift is more than just marketeering, for once. For a start, it's not new...only the name is. Which means that the AJAX approach - for it is more an approach than it is a technolog in itself - is in fact already tried and true. Secondly, its naming last year - by Jesse James Garrett (pictured), of Adaptive Path - has caught on not because the i-Technology world needed another acronym - it surely doesn't - but because it is the... (more)

Where's i-Technology Headed in 2008?

2007 was undoubtedly the year of Social Networking, but what of 2008? Will '08 be the year of "Unified Communications" or the year when CMS comes to stand for "Community Management System" - or even "Collaboration Management System"? Or will it be the year of the giga-merger, to beat the mere mega-mergers of 2007? At the end of each year, SYS-CON informally polls its globe-girdling network of software developers, industry executives, commentators, investors, writers, and editors. As always, the range and depth of their answers is fascinating, throwing light not just on where the industry is going but also how it's going to get there, why, because of who, and within what kind of time-scale. Enjoy! RIAs Versus AJAX o Ruby on Rails o PHP o Facebook Competitors Tim Bray Director of Web Technologies Sun Tim Bray managed the Oxford English Dictionary project at the Univers... (more)

Is Complexity Hurting Java?

EJB. JSP. JMS. JMX. JCA. JTA. JAAS. JAXP. JDBC. JNDI. This is a partial list of the acronyms you'll find in the 228-page J2EE v1.4 public draft. Of course, I was able to assemble this list of acronyms before I reached the bottom of page six. This new version of J2EE is presented as the Web services version, so to be fair I should add SOAP, SAAJ, JAX-RPC, and JAXR to this list. In this age of integration, I wouldn't feel right if I didn't include JCA and JACC. I also feel obligated to at least mention the unfortunate specifications that were absent the day acronyms were handed out, like servlets, JavaMail, J2EE management, and J2EE deployment. If this list of acronyms overwhelms you, I apologize. I do have a suggested course of action that will help you become educated in J2EE 1.4. Each one of the aforementioned acronyms is a specification unto itself, so all you hav... (more)

An Introduction to Abbot

Graphical user interface (GUI) testing is a potentially problematic area because constructing effective test cases is more difficult than the corresponding application logic. The roadblocks to effective functional GUI testing are: Traditional test coverage criteria like "80% coverage of the lines of code" may not be sufficient to trap all the user interaction scenarios. End users often use a different user task interaction model than the one conceived by the development team. Functional GUI testing needs to deal with GUI events as well as the effects of the underlying application logic that results in changes to the data and presentation. The common methods for functional GUI testing are the "record and execute" script technique and writing test programs for different scenarios. In the "record and execute," the test designer interacts with the GUI and all the eve... (more)

"Mobility is More than J2ME," Says Michael Yuan

I was reading Glen Cordrey's last J2ME column in this month's issue of JDJ. Glen mentions that, as the J2ME market has not matured with enough jobs, he is going back to J2EE and try to work on mobility integration issues in enterprise projects. I complete agree with him and in fact, this is the point I have always advocated in my writings. My keyword for mobility has always been "end-to-end." Although my experience with the J2ME job market is somewhat different from Glen's (I have to turn down new J2ME contracts to keep myself sane at this point), I understand that not everyone in J2ME had the same luck. Most of the "real" employment opportunities are still on the enterprise server side. But when we look at the future, I see three trends: The move to mobility is inevitable in the enterprise. The IT revolution has to reach hundreds of millions of mobile workers in orde... (more)