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Related Links: Wanted: 19 More of the Top Software People in the World Sung and Unsung i-Technology Heroes Who's Missing from SYS-CON's i-Technology Top Twenty?" Our search for the Twenty Top Software People in the World is nearing completion. In the SYS-CON tradition of empowering readers, we are leaving the final "cut" to you, so here are the top 40 nominations in alphabetical order. Our aim this time round is to whittle this 40 down to our final twenty, not (yet) to arrange those twenty in any order of preference. All you need to do to vote is to go to the Further Details page of any nominee you'd like to see end up in the top half of the poll when we close voting on Christmas Eve, December 24, and cast your vote or votes. To access the Further Details of each nominee just click on their name. Happy voting!   In alphabetical order the nominees are:   Tim Berner... (more)

Filtering the FUD from Java Politicking on "Open-Source Java"

Read "Let Java Go" - ESR Writes an Open Letter to Scott McNealy · Read "No Sun Is An Island," Says Javalobby Founder Read Should Sun "Let Java Go"? Counter-Arguments vs Open-Sourcing Java Read "Let's Collaborate on Open-Sourcing Java": IBM Writes Open Letter to Sun Read Sun's Schwartz: IBM's Request "Seems a Little Bonky" Until recently,  the ongoing Sun-IBM "open" Java debate had been a quiet collaboration (witness the agreement to allow Apache a "scholarship" for certification of Geronimo). That quiet debate had the lid blown clean off it recently by a series of very public (some might even say grandstanding) moves by Sun and IBM. The results are less about who's right than they are about who can play the media trump card better. I've spoken with people from IBM and Sun over the past few weeks, as well as some of the other players in this developer melodrama. And here, bes... (more)

i-Technology's All-Time Top 100?

Gene Amdahl: Implementer in the 60s of a milestone in computer technology: the concept of compatibility between systems Marc Andreessen: Pioneer of Mosaic, the first browser to navigate the WWW; co-founder of Netscape John Vincent Atanasoff: Inventor of an electronic computer in the late 1930s not for fun or glory, but because he had problems for it to solve Charles Babbage: Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge in 1828; inventor of the 'calculating machine' John Backus: Inventor (with IBM) of FORTRAN (FORmula TRANslator) in 1956 Ralph Baer: "The man who invented video games" (Pong) Kent Beck: Creator of JUnit and pioneer of eXtreme Programming (XP) Bob Bemer: One of the developers of COBOL and the ASCII naming standard for IBM (1960s) Tim Berners-Lee: "Father of the World Wide Web" and expectant father of the Semantic Web D J Bernstein: Author of qmail Jos... (more)

JavaFX Is A Too Late Response from Sun for Rich Internet Applications

Yakov Fain's Blog When I run into yet another posting about adding yet another cute little element to Java syntax, it makes me sad and angry. It seems that people are converting Java into a some kind of a science project. Someone asks, "Kids, what new features you'd like us to add to Java language?" And the chorus responds, "We want this, we want that...And we want it now!" "OK kids, we'll give you this and we'll give you that. We can't give it to you now cause we have a process. We'll run experiments on humans, and if not too many software developers will stop using Java because of these new features, we'll stick them into the language spec. " We had a nice language, then it became a platform, then for some people it became a religion. Some time ago I was trying to participate in various Java forums. But then I realized that if you are not 100% for Java, some of them b... (more)

Developing Rich Client Applications Using Swing

Before describing solutions available for rich client application development, it would be a good idea to explain what exactly a rich client application is and which rich client topologies can feasibly be built using the Java platform. In the main, a rich client is a part of a software system that contains a user interface (UI) and whose front end is "rich," i.e., the user interface has rich graphical content and is highly interactive; a rich client application is also called a desktop application, since it provides content and functionalities that are usually provided by applications on the desktop of your own PC (access to local resources, complex user interface, the capability to connect to remote services, etc.). Enterprise applications are an example of applications that require a "rich" front end, that is, applications employed in enterprises to manage some ... (more)

Unveiling the java.lang.Out OfMemoryError

When we encounter a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError, we often find that Java heap dumps, along with other artifacts, are generated by the Java Virtual Machine. If you feel like jumping right into a Java heap dump when you get a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError, don't worry, it's a normal thought. You may be able to discover something serendipitously, but it's not always the best idea to analyze Java heap dumps, depending on the situation you are facing. We first need to investigate the root cause of the java.lang.OutOfMemoryError. Only after the root cause is identified can we decide whether or not to analyze Java heap dumps. What is a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError? Why in the world does it occur? Let's find out. What Is a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError? A java.lang.OutOfMemoryError is a subclass of java.lang.VirtualMachineError that is thrown when the Java Virtual Machine is broken or... (more)

Book Review: Core Java (9th Edition), Volume I and Volume II

This review covers both Core Java Volume I--Fundamentals (9th Edition) and Core Java, Volume II--Advanced Features (9th Edition). Both books are part of the Prentice Hall Core Series. I actually got Volume II first and liked it so much I ordered Volume I. I felt like I was missing the first half of the story. Especially when I downloaded the code and both volumes were included. These two books take you on quite a journey. The first volume starts off with a great overview and history of Java. It then goes into how to download, install, and configure both the JDK and Eclipse. The authors uses Eclipse throughout both volumes. The rest of Volume I is dedicate to covering the fundamental concepts of the Java language and the basics of user-interface programming. I have listed the chapters in Volume I below. Volume I Chapter 1. An Introduction to Java Chapter 2. The Java Prog... (more)

Implementing Business Rules in Java

Part 1 of this series on business rule engines (see "Implementing Business Rules in Java," JDJ, Vol. 5, issue 5 [May 2000]) addressed the question of how to integrate the rule engine into a Java application. To review...business rules are the policies and procedures that describe or constrain the way an organization conducts business. Rule Engines Make Their Comeback Twenty years after it first made waves, rule-based technology is making a comeback. Java developers with an eye on the e-commerce market are becoming aware of how integrating business rules and objects in Java can help expand Java into new niches within Web-based applications. They're everywhere: in corporate charters, marketing strategies, pricing polices, product and service offerings, and customer relationship management practices. Business rules are also in the legal documents that regulate your bus... (more)

An Introduction to Abbot

Graphical user interface (GUI) testing is a potentially problematic area because constructing effective test cases is more difficult than the corresponding application logic. The roadblocks to effective functional GUI testing are: Traditional test coverage criteria like "80% coverage of the lines of code" may not be sufficient to trap all the user interaction scenarios. End users often use a different user task interaction model than the one conceived by the development team. Functional GUI testing needs to deal with GUI events as well as the effects of the underlying application logic that results in changes to the data and presentation. The common methods for functional GUI testing are the "record and execute" script technique and writing test programs for different scenarios. In the "record and execute," the test designer interacts with the GUI and all the eve... (more)

VeriTest Finds .NET Pet Shop Over Ten Times Faster than Oracle-optimized J2EE Pet Store

(May 25, 2002) - An audit of the latest Oracle and Microsoft-published performance data for the Java and .NET Pet Shop found the .NET Pet Shop to be over ten times faster than the latest optimized J2EE Pet Store based on the latest Oracle-published benchmark data. The independent auditor, VeriTest, also found serious issues with the Oracle-revised Java Pet Store application and testing methodology, including missing application functionality and flawed benchmark load test settings. This past March, Oracle published new benchmark data for the Java Pet Store based on a revised implementation of the Sun Java Pet Store 1.1.2. In May, VeriTest, a respected leader in independent software testing invited Oracle, to participate in an independent audit of their published benchmark data. Oracle declined to participate. VeriTest performed an audit of Oracle's data based on th... (more)

The BEA WebLogic Platform

This spring, BEA will deliver a new, unified application infrastructure platform. The new product name had not been announced as of this writing, so we refer to it here simply as the BEA WebLogic Platform. The new platform represents an integration and extension of the current WebLogic suite of products. Its delivery is an important milestone and opportunity for the WebLogic developer community. This article provides an overview of the release of the BEA WebLogic Platform, describing the process of technology platform innovation and adoption, and the technology disruptions that enable the emergence of an application infrastructure platform. It also discusses the components that are being integrated into the platform, current plans for new integration features, some directions for BEA's platform strategy going forward, and what this means for WebLogic developers. T... (more)