Java Platform, Enterprise Edition

Java EE Journal

Subscribe to Java EE Journal: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Java EE Journal: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories

Can you build a custom dynamic Web content management solution and a high-performance dynamic professional sports Web site from scratch on J2EE in a short period of time? Oh yes, it must have Fortune 500 sophistication and be delivered within a midmarket budget. Impossible? Well, that's exactly what Braegen Group, Inc. (www.braegen.com), a Toronto-based e-business solution provider, recently accomplished for Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment Ltd. (MLSE), owners of the Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team. Braegen's breakthrough Web content management software, called Oriel, is among the first software products in the market to take advantage of "Power Servlets," the servlet middleware technology from Espressiv, Inc (www.espressiv.com). Formed in 1927, the Toronto Maple Leafs is one of the NHL's oldest and most decorated hockey teams. Leaf fans are fiercely loyal, hoping f... (more)

Implementing J2EE/.NET Interoperability Using WebSphere MQ Part 2 - Putting theory into practice

In Part 1 of this series, we discussed how the use of messaging software can alleviate some of the problems with integration of J2EE and .NET environments using Web services. In this article we will discuss implementation of the proposed architecture on both J2EE and .NET platforms, along with possible enhancements of the proposed solution. All of the code referenced in this article is available for download from www.sys-con.com/websphere/sourcec.cfm. Implementing the .NET Client Although support pack MA07 supports all the basic functionality of WebSphere MQ and is implemented based on the WebSphere MQ Java object model, implementation of interoperability with a JMS-based J2EE implementation poses the following challenges: 1.  Implementation of JMS for WebSphere MQ introduces the RFH2 header, which is used by this implementation to support JMS-required features (e.g.,... (more)

"Oracle Fusion Middleware" Is Born: New Oracle/JDE/PeopleSoft Umbrella Brand

"The new architecture and the results companies will achieve will be truly revolutionary, but the path to the new successor product line will be evolutionary," said Oracle Senior Vice President of Applications Development John Wookey back in January, when he detailed plans for "Project Fusion" - a next generation information-oriented architecture and application set supporting the best features, flows and usability traits of Oracle, PeopleSoft and JD Edwards products. This week sees the fulfillment of that vison, with the announcement of "Oracle Fusion Middleware," the rebranding of that product line. "The new combined organization, comprised of the best talent in the enterprise software industry, will provide customers with greater innovation, support and expertise across industries," said Wookey at the time. "Our goal is to help customers achieve unprecedented leve... (more)

Appcelerator Integrates RIA Platform with Google App Engine

Appcelerator announced that it has updated its platform to allow applications built using Appcelerator to be deployed to the free new Google App Engine. Used together, the offerings give developers a fast route to developing, deploying, managing and scaling their applications. Appcelerator is an integrated platform that fuses RIA and service-oriented architecture (SOA). With Appcelerator, developers can assemble rich, interactive web applications without the need for JavaScript or player-based plug-ins. Web applications can be implemented on Java/J2EE, PHP, Ruby, .NET, Python and Perl. Appcelerator for App Engine runs on Python, the scripting language currently supported by App Engine. As Google expands support to other languages, Appcelerator for App Engine will follow suit. App Engine has generated so much interest since its April 8 introduction because it fundame... (more)

Sun Microsystems Expands Sun Startup Essentials Program to Emerging Markets in Asia

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 8 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sun Microsystems, Inc. today announced that it is expanding its successful Sun Startups Essentials(SM) program into the People's Republic of China (PRC) and India to help early stage companies get up and running quickly while conserving cash in these emerging markets. The program (http://www.sun.com/startupessentials) offers startups discounts on a range of Sun's industry-leading technologies and services and the ability to subscribe to Web hosting services from Sun partners at deeply discounted rates. In today's market, early stage companies are challenged to bring highly available and scalable applications to market quickly and cost-effectively. These startup companies are constantly looking for ways to become more efficient with limited resources while planning for long-term success. Sun provides startups wit... (more)

Secrets Of The Masters: Core Java Job Interview Questions

JDJ's Enterprise Editor, Yakov Fain (pictured) writes: If you are planning to hit the job market,  you may need to refresh some of the Java basic terms and techniques to prepare yourself for a technical interview. Let me offer you some of the core Java questions that you might expect during the interviews.  For  most questions  I’ve provided only  short  answers to encourage further research.  I have included only  questions for mid (*) and senior level (**) Java developers. These sample questions could also become handy for people who need to interview Java developers (see also the article "Interviewing Enterprise Java Developers"). Disclaimer. This article has been originally published three or four years ago, hundreds of thousands Java developers have read it, but I still use some of these questions while interviewing Java developers. Guess what? Every other Jav... (more)

The i-Technology Right Stuff

Related Links: Wanted: 19 More of the Top Software People in the World Sung and Unsung i-Technology Heroes Who's Missing from SYS-CON's i-Technology Top Twenty?" Our search for the Twenty Top Software People in the World is nearing completion. In the SYS-CON tradition of empowering readers, we are leaving the final "cut" to you, so here are the top 40 nominations in alphabetical order. Our aim this time round is to whittle this 40 down to our final twenty, not (yet) to arrange those twenty in any order of preference. All you need to do to vote is to go to the Further Details page of any nominee you'd like to see end up in the top half of the poll when we close voting on Christmas Eve, December 24, and cast your vote or votes. To access the Further Details of each nominee just click on their name. Happy voting!   In alphabetical order the nominees are:   Tim Berner... (more)

Java Developer's Journal Exclusive: 2006 "JDJ Editors' Choice" Awards

The editors of SYS-CON Media's Java Developer's Journal are in a unique position when it comes to Java development. All are active coders in their "day jobs," and they have the good fortune in getting a heads-up on many of the latest and greatest software releases. They were asked to nominate three products from the last 12 months that they felt had not only made a major impact on their own development, but also on the Java community as a whole. The following is a list of each editor's selections and the reason why they chose that product. Joe Winchester Desktop Java Editor SwingLabs SwingLabs is an open source laboratory for exploring new ways to make Swing applications easier to write, with improved performance and greater visual appeal. It is an umbrella project for various open source initiatives sponsored by Sun Microsystems and is part of the java.net community... (more)

Creating Web Applications with the Eclipse Web Tools Project

The Web Tools Project (WTP) by the Eclipse Foundation is a set of open source tools that substantially reduce the time required for the development of Web applications, EJBs, and Web services. The WTP's current version is 0.7.1 and version 1.0 is coming later this year. The framework provides wizards and tools to create EJBs, Web components such as servlets and JSPs, and Web services using the Axis engine. It also provides source editors for HTML, JavaScript, CSS, JSP, SQL, XML, DTD, XSD, and WSDL; graphical editors for XSD, WSDL, J2EE project builders, models, and a J2EE navigator; a Web service wizard, explorer, and WS-I Test Tools; and database access, query tools, and models. In this article I'll show you how to develop and deploy a JSP Web application with WTP in less than an hour. I'll also cover the creation and deployment of a basic servlet and editing JSP ... (more)

Who Are The All-Time Heroes of i-Technology?

I wonder how many people, as I did, found themselves thrown into confusion by the death last week of Jean Ichbiah (pictured), inventor of Ada.  Learning that the inventor of a computer programming language is already old enough to have lived 66 years (Ichbiah was 66 when he succumbed to brain cancer) is a little like learning that your 11-year-old daughter has grown up and left home or that the first car you ever bought no longer is legal because it runs on gasoline in an age where all automobiles must run on water. How can something as novel, as new, as a computing language possibly already be so old-fangled that an early practitioner like Ichbiah can already no longer be with us? The thought was so disquieting that it took me immediately back to the last time I wrote about Ichbiah, and indeed about Ada Lovelace for whom his language was named. It was in the context ... (more)

Java vs C++ "Shootout" Revisited

Keith Lea writes of the benchmark, on his results page, "I was sick of hearing people say Java was slow, when I know it's pretty fast, so I took the benchmark code for C++ and Java from the now outdated Great Computer Language Shootout and ran the tests myself." Lea used G++ (GCC) 3.3.1 20030930 (with glibc 2.3.2-98) for the C++, with the -O2 flag (for both i386 and i686). He compiled the Java code normally with the Sun Java 1.4.2_01 compiler, and ran it with the Sun 1.4.2_01 JVM. He ran the tests on Red Hat Linux 9 / Fedora Test1 with the 2.4.20-20.9 kernel on a T30 laptop. The laptop "has a Pentium 4 mobile chip, 512MB of memory, a sort of slow disk," he notes. The results he got were that Java is significantly faster than optimized C++ in many cases. "They also show that no one should ever run the client JVM when given the choice," Lea adds. ("Everyone has the c... (more)